Sadhanapada: A rebirth

It was the winter of 2016 when I had hit the wall and was truly longing for something unknown to come into my experience! And the thought and questions which constantly rebounded in my head ever since I was a kid gained momentum- “Well there is something more to Life! How do I find out? Who is going to guide me?”

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To recap, the questions about life was something which I always pondered as a kid but this longing did get lost in the mundane cycle: of getting good grades, of getting degrees, finding the security of a high paying job and to get into the security of a steady relationship. Achievements, accolades, milestones lacked fulfillment. My Life then was a bunch of fleeting moments of happiness. I knew for sure this was not Life!

Ironically the word security is crippling as it snatches one the opportunity of exploring oneself or experiencing Life as is.

However, in early 2015 I did quit my job in the hope of exploring Life and more so indulged in the things I loved and forayed outside my comfort zone; blogging, traveling, fiction writing, photography, publishing my own coffee table book,  working in a couple of startups as a content writer and quite recently freelancing in digital marketing.

While I was doing the above things outside my comfort zone there was something parallel which I had hit upon and this was giving me all the strength to do the things with utter ease.

So the winter of 2016 had passed and the beginning of 2017 brought me face to face to this program called Inner Engineering. A friend had suggested this and I thought, “Anyway this program is just for 7 days and that too for 3 hours only, let me give it a shot.” Trust me, I had no clue who Sadhguru was and I had not even watched any of his videos on YouTube.

Well, as they say when the student is ready, the Guru appears!

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The program made utter sense to the logical mind that I had. My journey through Inner engineering is out here: My experience of Inner Engineering

Well, within the next couple of years I had completed all the advanced programs and I was waiting for this final advanced program called Samyama which is conducted by Sadhguru himself. The practices, the kriyas were working wonders in my Life and I knew the final program with Sadhguru would be utterly life-changing!

Fortunately I did get this opportunity in March 2019 and it was an experience which I cannot express and still cannot fathom but it brought me face to face with Life as is; sans illusion.

Even though I had been volunteering at Isha in Bangalore since 2017, I quite had this urge to explore myself in a more insightful conscious way, to serve as a volunteer and also to experience life in the Ashram at Coimbatore.

Well, this is when Sadhanapada fit the bill and it happened to be the right platform to enhance my Sadhana and the perfect opportunity to offer myself as a Volunteer.

Sadhanapada is a 7 months residential program offered by Sadhguru to enhance one’s Sadhana and also to volunteer in the Ashram. The only pre-requisite is that one should have  completed the Inner Engineering program.

 

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I had decided to go ahead with the program but when I broke the news to my family they were hesitant initially (agreed upon later) and a few acquaintances, relatives were aghast at the decision and they had the below questions:

  • What do you get at the end of 7 months, considering you won’t be earning?
  • Is the program going to train you on something from which you can earn money later on?
  • Are you going to get any skills or become an expert in Yoga?
  • Why do you go all the way out there to serve or volunteer when you can do it in your home?
  • The organization is just getting young people to work in the name of volunteering for free, are you mad to go there?
  • You have just started a successful freelancing business, why are you leaving it?

I couldn’t answer to the logical minds of people as to what tangible things I would get at the end of it all because what I would be experiencing is far from anything tangible.

I quite didn’t have the answers to the above and more so even if I wanted to try and explain that would be beyond comprehension or probably misunderstood, so I remained mum but my decision was unwavering.

My parents initially were perturbed and anxious but once they got to know that this was something that would make a difference to my life in a big way, they gave in and helped me in prepping up for the program ahead.

I was elated when the interview went well and I was eagerly waiting for the confirmation with each passing day. Finally I had received the confirmation message and  I knew I was given the chance of a lifetime.

Come July 2019 and I was off to Isha Yoga Center, Coimbatore.

The first month passed where I indulged in the orientation, adjusting to the intense schedule, getting to know the Ashram, working in my volunteering/Seva department and of course gearing up for the months ahead. I knew I had to cherish each moment and give 100% in whatever I did. I was grateful that I could enhance my Sadhana in the consecrated spaces of the Ashram and  being in the Ashram was something I had always dreamt about. Well, it did come true and thanks to Sadhanapada for giving me the solace of a rebirth.

A day in the life of Sadhanapada:

Sadhanapada has been an intense program which has changed my life for the better. I had forgotten to enjoy life just as it is, thanks to the program that I am quite able to be joyful without any external things or distractions. It has taught me the very basics of how to lead a Life joyfully and I wish everyone goes through Sadhanapada.

I am fortunate to have shared this journey with my fellow participants from various walks of life. Some had left amazing opportunities, some high-paying jobs, some their loved ones only to learn and to know the being that they are. I am so grateful to have been a part of this program with such inspiring and motivating people.

 

These 7 months have given me so much that I wonder if I would have got these realizations / learnings  in 7 lifetimes at all. Below are a few realizations which have come by:

  1. Be it in my previous companies or any work for that matter I used to work efficiently but there was some amount of compulsiveness that I always ended up having a burn out time and again but these 7 months has brought me to a point where whatever activity I am given, I do it with 100% involvement. There is no compulsiveness and I am not attached to the work I just complete it to the best of my abilities.
  2. My likes and dislikes have come down and I indulge in what is needed to be done no matter what it is. I have come face to face with my limitations and I consciously work on them.
  3. During my freelancing stint, I did have sufficient time to do the Kriyas and practices at home but somewhere I would miss out on some Kriyas if I had more work to cater to. But in these 7 months I learnt how to manage my time and balance both the Sadhana and Seva(my departmental work). The first couple of months I struggled but after that it I could manage it with ease.
  4. My day started at 3 AM and ended by 9:30 PM but I could go through Sadhana, Seva, daily chores with utter ease. I never used to get completely exhausted, well probably at times a bit tired on certain days but I was vibrant enough to go about the work that was needed to be done
  5. Apart from Sadhana and Seva we took part in a various programs, festivals. The times when we danced, played some games it felt like I was a kid again and I involved myself without any inhibitions and reluctance.
  6. The joy of volunteering is truly exhilarating. To serve, help, support, to do an activity without expecting anything in return is something I learnt here in Isha. The fulfillment that I received here is far more than what I received in any job that I was paid for.
  7. There were of course certain challenging circumstances with people and work. These ordeals helped me to see through myself, my limitations and above all to be compassionate to the person at the other end and understand from his/her point of view. This was quite a struggle and also a revelation and it took me sometime to understand this. Whatever be the situation, it is actually how I perceive and respond to it.
  8. The entire program helped me to see myself as is without any false identifications. The walls, the boundaries I had built for my security just evaporated and I was bare facing things and this felt liberating. Not being in control is such a blessed thing for you are free. This made me realize that I had been such a fool growing up.
  9. I don’t need any reason to be happy, I am joyful always. There is a certain stillness or rather a distance that has come by with the mind and body.
  10. I was faced with a personal emergency during the program. As I went to meet my family, the way I responded and behaved was something out of the ordinary and I knew things had transformed within me for the better. Though it was an unfortunate incident, it actually helped me to evaluate my growth and impact of the program. There was a strong reluctance from relatives, acquaintances (not my parents thankfully) that I stay back for the family and not complete the program as they considered it to be some unnecessary time-pass or a lame thing which I was doing(this wouldn’t have been the case if I was working abroad or doing my masters in a far off place – probably these have some credibility in their eyes). Though I was hurt that they felt this way, my commitment to the program didn’t waver. I didn’t feel the need to explain this to anyone albeit my parents and I resumed the program for I knew this was for my Life.

ShwethaKrish_ShoePenLens_IshaBiksha_outingShwethaKrish_ShoePenLens_Team Isha Biksha

I would like to throw light upon certain misconceptions that some people usually have or the Society has-

  1. Going to an Ashram and being on a Spiritual path:
    • Myth: If one goes to the Ashram, they will take on Bramhacharya, one will be hypnotised and eventually you will take up Sanyas.
    • Fact: Ashram is a conducive place for one to learn, enhance one’s Sadhana and also learn to serve / volunteer. Of course one gets transformed but for the better. It is as Mahatma Gandhi quoted “We must become the change we wish to see in the world.” 
  2. Age and Vocation
    •  Myth: Spirituality is for the old people and for people who are jobless
    • Fact: With thousands of young people already dependent on antidepressants, medication for stress / anxiety due to the lifestyle, work habits – Yoga is the need of the hour. It is better to start working on one’s well-being at the earliest and to have a positive approach to life rather than having this thought on the death-bed. Yoga is a tool which would equip one to lead a better conscious life.
  3. Renunciation
    • Myth: If you are on a spiritual path, then you have to leave your family, be a celibate and head to an ashram or the mountains
    • Fact: Yoga teaches one to be in balance and equips one with various tools to enhance one’s energies. This helps one tackle the challenges in the daily life with elan and to live life to the fullest and not just living a mundane life. It equips one to to take on Life and not run away from situations.
  4. Belief vs Seeking
    • Myth: Learning yoga will make one religious and a Hindu
    • Fact: Yoga is not a religion, it is a Science. Being on a Spiritual path is when you are choosing neither to be a religious fanatic(believing in God) nor an atheist(believing that there is no God)  you are just being a third kind- A seeker – Trying to delve deep within to find out more about yourself and more so get in touch with the Truth!
  5. Source of Happiness
    • Myth: Having a secure job, relationships, accolades, materialistic things is the source of happiness
    • Fact: All the above may give you pleasure, happiness but it is only momentary and elusive. Being in Yoga makes one blissful. It doesn’t matter what challenges life throws at you, you will be able to handle things with elan while being happy and blissful. By growing materialistically or spiritually we are only trying to expand but spiritual expansion happens consciously not compulsively. Source of Happiness is within you!
  6. Life
    • Myth: Life is Birth – Education – Job- Family – Death
    • Fact: The above is a part of life but we think life is just that and we forget the opportunity to know ourselves and explore life. To delve within is the only way out

Why am I sharing this with you all?

It is quite hard for me to articulate the happenings and experiences within me and I know I couldn’t do so even if I had all the gamut of words at my disposal. The challenges of life are many and may cripple you or may leave you dejected and lost but when you are on a constant journey of seeking the inner dimension, the life challenges won’t matter and you will be able to handle anything that comes your way with ease. Life will seem amazing and you will rightfully know how to enjoy a day! I want you all to experience this dimension of Life.

Open to all from all walks of life

Sadhanapada is open to all – My fellow participants were from across the world from various walks of life; farmers, doctors, engineers, yoga enthusiasts, digital marketers, bankers, entrepreneurs, teachers, homemakers, students, architects you name it we were all a part of this program. Young and old made this program a wonderful experience. I am sure you must be wondering that it won’t be easy for you to take this decision to apply for this program. Trust me, give it a thought and if you really want to seek what this Life is about then think no more. Take the plunge, everything will fall into place; it is quite a curious miracle.

Thanks to the Ashramites, the Bramhacharis, the Bramhacharinis, the Teachers, the Volunteers to have welcomed us in the Ashram and for constantly taking care of us and guiding us throughout the program and much after that as well. The program wouldn’t have been possible without all their support. And I am so fortunate for this opportunity to have come by and quite can’t thank Sadhguru enough for making this a possibility.

Below are some glimpses, a few from Sadhanapada culmination.

Photo Courtesy: Isha Foundation

 

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Links and videos about Sadhanapada

Registration Link: https://isha.sadhguru.org/in/en/volunteer/sadhanapada

Further, please check Sadhanapada – Sadhanapada Tips and Guidelines on how best to prepare for the program. Read through this very descriptive post that would answer most of your queries!

So are you ready for transformation and to delve within yourselves?

 

 

The Annapurna Circuit- Abode of Solitude

ANNAPURNA CIRCUIT – The Journey

Before I get on to my experience let’s get into, What is the Annapurna Circuit?

Here is an excerpt from Wikipedia:

“The Circuit is a trek of about 160-230 km within the mountain ranges of central Nepal.  This trek crosses two different river valleys and encircles the Annapurna Massif. The path reaches its highest point at Thorung La pass (5416m/17769 ft), touching the edge of the Tibetan Plateau. Practically all trekkers hike the route anticlockwise, as this way the daily altitude gain is slower, and crossing the high Thorong La pass is easier and safer.

The mountain scenery, seen at close quarters includes the Annapurna Massif (Annapurna I-IV), Dhaulagiri, Macchapuchhre, Manaslu, Gangapurna, Tilicho Peak, Pisang Peak and Paungda Danda. Numerous other peaks of 6000-8000m in elevation rise from the Annapurna range”

 “You are not in the mountains. The mountains are in you.”  – John Muir

So true, the experience was truly within but of course laid with vivid spectacular sceneries on the go!

My heart raced as I ran up the long flight of stairs at a neighbourhood temple. It was a week since I had started to run along the stairs to get a cardio workout in place along with practising Hatha Yoga for the past 4 months. Another three weeks were left for my friend and I to meet the mighty Himalayas! This time we were gearing up for the beautiful Annapurna Circuit Trail.

I had butterflies in my tummy for over a week as my mind raced through the thought ‘Will I be able to reach up to 18000 feet?’ Well, I would soon figure out.

Bangalore-Delhi-Gorakhpur-Sunauli-IndoNepalBorder-Pokhara – All in 36 hours!

Bangalore to Pokhara was quite an adventurous ride. Bangalore to Delhi by flight and then we had to book a night bus to Gorakhpur as the train we had booked was in fact non-existent since a month even though we had received our confirmation for the seats! Well, the Indian Railways sure gives one an experience to remember always!

Before Boarding at Bangalore Airport, Shwetha Krish, ShoePenLens
Before Boarding at Bangalore Airport

The bus journey was eventful; firstly it arrived late, secondly the two of us were cramped on the upper berth of the bus; thirdly the bus driver kept on honking throughout the night as if he had to play a song. I woke up uneasily to some noise and then the driver called out, ‘Gorakhpur!’

Somewhere near Agra on the way to Gorakhpur, Shwetha Krish, ShoePenLens
Somewhere near Agra on the way to Gorakhpur

My friend and I hurriedly got out of the bus and collected our luggage. We luckily, found a share-auto which took us to the bus-stand. There we sat in the bus to Sunauli.

We quickly managed to freshen ourselves in a nearby lodge and later sat in the bus. The bus ride was pleasant as the bus veered by the farm lands and headed towards the mountains. After about five hours we reached the India-Nepal border.

Cycle-Rickshaw across the Indo-Nepal border, Shwetha Krish, ShoePenlens
Cycle-Rickshaw across the Indo-Nepal border

We got down from the bus and crossed the border in a cycle-rickshaw. This was quite a lovely slow ride.

 

We ate a quick Nepali staple lunch and jumped on a bus to Pokhara. The bus was rickety and we were caught in a jam up the mountain roads for about an hour.

Jam on the mountain roads enroute Pokhara, Shwetha Krish, ShoePenLens
Jam on the mountain roads enroute Pokhara

After about nine hours in the bus we reached Pokhara.

As we reached our stay at the ‘Mountain View’ – a warm couple invited us and showed us to our rooms. We went out to eat at the opposite small shack. The owner cum cook got us hot rotis and palak paneer. It was something to die for. We smacked our lips and licked our fingers until the entire curry was nowhere to be seen.

Pokhara is the second largest city in Nepal and it is the gateway to Annapurna Circuit and one can see the Dhaulagiri, Manaslu and Annapurna ranges from the city.

We woke up to a beautiful day and went out in search of the ACAP office. Once we finished our registration and got our trekker card, we headed up for the Phewa lake.

Phewa Lake, Shwetha Krish, ShoePenLens
Phewa Lake

As we soothed our tired legs and soul, the sky invited us to be a spectator while it painted colorful parachutes along the clouds.

Colorful Parachutes adorn the sky, Shwetha Krish, ShoePenLens
Colorful Parachutes adorn the sky

We later did some shopping and booked the bus to Bhulbhule for the morrow.

Day 1: Pokhara-Besisahar-Bhulbhule-Ngadi (3000 feet)

A six hour drive from Pokhara to Bhulbhule was amazing and beautiful. Bhulbule is a small town along the Marshyangdi river.

The drive took us from narrow roads to dusty mountain roads to long roads through the tropical forests. Well one could catch a glimpse of the snow clad mountains throughout the way.

At Bhulbhule, the start of our trek, Annapurna Circuit trail, Shwetha Krish, ShoePenLens
At Bhulbhule, the start of our trek

We started our trek along the road from Bhulbhule and reached Ngadi, a quaint quiet place in the midst of the valley by the Marshyangdi River. We got talking to these children at whose home-stay we stayed for the night. A brilliant 8-year old kept us engaged and entertained us throughout the evening. He took us to the river as well and played with us. They were quite an endearing family and we had a simple sumptuous food for the night.

 

Day 2: Ngadi-Bahudanda-Ghermu-Jagat-Chamche (4500 feet)

We got up quite early at around 5 am and headed to the trail. It was a gorgeous start to the day with trekking up the beautiful lush mountains followed by Chai and breakfast at Bahudanda. The view of the mountains and the river was mesmerizing.🗻

Breakfast at Bahudanda Annapurna Circuit Trail, ShwethaKrish,ShoePenLens
Breakfast at Bahudanda Annapurna Circuit Trail

The trail to Ghermu was downhill and we had a nice hike. But the trek to the next village Jagat was quite an ordeal with the sun beating down us. The trail was really difficult. My legs were giving away and my mind was too occupied and stressed out with the sun beating down. We kind of pushed ourselves to Jagat and were in for a sumptuous Dal bhat. None of us spoke for the next 20 mins as we enjoyed our meal in silence and rested our aching body on the wooden chairs. As our minds contemplated on taking a ride, we beat it and trudged our aching selves ahead to the next place Chamche where we decided to stay for the night as we were thoroughly exhausted. Chamche happened to be right opposite a beautiful falls and it started to rain as we freshened ourselves and sat down to drink some tea. After a quick dinner we crashed.

Waterfalls at Chamche, Annapurna Circuit Trail, ShwethaKrish, ShoePenLens
Waterfalls at Chamche, Annapurna Circuit Trail

This day was truly terrifying and it was on our minds whether we would make it along the rest of the trail. Well we had to see for ourselves in the days to come!

Day 3: Chamche-Tal-Dharapani-Danaque (7200 feet)

An early start to Day 3 had us walking across a lot of bridges and mountain paths carved along the walls of the mountain.

On the way from Chamche to Tal, Annapurna Circuit Trail, ShwethaKrish, ShoePenLens
On the way from Chamche to Tal, Annapurna Circuit Trail
The Triangle Mountain, Annapurna Circuit Trail, ShwethaKrish, ShoePenLens
The Triangle Mountain, Annapurna Circuit Trail

Post which we reached Manang district and entered Tal, a lovely hamlet by the river. This place is very scenic; the lush green valleys, the shimmering Marshyangdi river and of course the stalwarts-Mountains held a very gripping hold of the scenery.

Tal, Annapurna Circuit Trail, ShwethaKrish, ShoePenLens
Tal, Annapurna Circuit Trail

The path led us up and down the mountain ranges and we were greeted by a lot of lovely falls. We had our lunch at Dharapani, a small village and headed to Danaque for the night.  At 7000 odd feet, the weather was cold and it rained from late evening to late into the night.  Highlight of this day was this beauty of a place, Tal and the vivid sceneries on the trail. We also happened to see a Tomato Tree!

Tomato tree at one of the homestays in Tal, Annapurna Circuit Trail, ShwethaKrish, ShoePenLens
Tomato tree at one of the homestays in Tal, Annapurna Circuit Trail

 

Day 4: Danaque-Timang-Manaslu-Kyoto-Chame (8891 feet)

We woke up to a chilly morning and geared up for the trek. As travellers, we took to the road early.
After a nervy crossing along the stream across the road, we were faced by a steep ascent into the cold woods.

Across the stream on the road from Chame, Annapurna Circuit Trail, ShwethaKrish, ShoePenLens
Across the stream on the road from Chame, Annapurna Circuit Trail

After an arduous climb in the narrow slushy mountain paths, we came to a small village called Timang from where the Manaslu peaks came into view. I was in for a treat and I donned the cap of a shutterbug. A breakfast by the view set us on the trail with some zestful energy.

Manaslu Ranges and Peak, Timang, Annapurna Circuit Trail, ShwethaKrish, ShoePenLens
Manaslu Ranges and Peak, Timang, Annapurna Circuit Trail

The trail led us on through dusty roads, narrow paths along small villages and after quite a descent we came to a place called Kyoto. One can view the gorgeous Annapurna II from here.
I could just get a partial view of the peak on my camera and I was hoping to come across her soon.

Annapurna II, Kyoto, Annapurna Cirucit Trail, ShwethaKrish, ShoePenLens
Annapurna II, Kyoto, Annapurna Cirucit Trail

And we reached Chame for the night. It started raining there on but we had a nice warm sleep.

Day 5: Chame-Barathang-Dukha Pokhari-Lower Pisang (10662 feet)

The clouds cleared up to a bright sunny day. We had a lovely hike up the mountain paths. Our next pit-stop was Barathang, a small place with lots of apple orchards and a beautiful tea house. Excitement took us over and we enjoyed our delicious breakfast by the mountains, orchards and it was a clear day.

 

Later we trudged on and reached Dukha pokhari where we relished a couple of cookies given by a monk the previous day at the monastery at Kyoto.

The next stop lower Pisang awaited us. A long hike in the dusty mountain roads and beautiful vistas led us to Lower Pisang.

 

After we relaxed and had lunch, we hiked up to Upper Pisang, a dwelling a little above which offered views of the lovely Annapurna II and a monastery welcomed us. We retired for the night at Lower Pisang.

 

Annapurna Range from Lower Pisang, Annapurna Circuit Trail, ShwethaKrish, ShoePenLens
Annapurna Range from Lower Pisang, Annapurna Circuit Trail

Day 6: Lower Pisang-Humde-Manang (11614 feet)

A gorgeous day as we saw the gorgeous Annapurnas IV, II and III and also the shining Gangapurna glacier and Tilicho peak. Prior to getting to the peaks we started our day from Lower Pisang. Morning was pretty cold and cloudy. We braved the winds as we hiked up the dusty trails and after a short ascent we walked through pine tree forests and the vistas opened up to brown rocky mountains.

 

Humde was our next pit-stop and it has its own small airport, fancy one eh.

We hit upon the road, Annapurna and Tilicho peaks were right along the way…😍

 

About a couple of hours later we reached Brakha where we relished cinnamon roll at the oldest bakery.

We took to the road along the glorious mountains and reached Manang, 11000 odd feet. It was pretty cold and windy but sunny. 😐

Manang is a pit-stop for many trekkers to acclimatize for a day or two before heading to Thorung La Pass or Tilicho Peak. One can also visit a couple of gompas which are close by and also the Gangapurna Glacier.

We attended the High Altitude training on AMS organized by ACAP. There were a lot of trekkers from around the world.

Day 7: Manang

Today being our rest day we woke up late. We decided to visit Prakhen gompa at about 12500 odd feet and get acclimatized.

The hike was along narrow mountain paths and was a bit slippery owing to loose gravel.

But it was a good hike and we reached a beautiful view point from where we got a panoramic view of Annapurna IV, II and III.

 


The view also gave us the complete mountain-scape of Gangapurna glacier and Tilicho peak.

Gangapurna Lake, Manang, Annapurna Circuit Trail, ShwethaKrish, ShoePenLens
Gangapurna Lake, Manang, Annapurna Circuit Trail-2

Given a chance, I could just spend the day looking at these gorgeous mountains albeit the weather. Further on we hiked and reached the Gompa.

Praken Gompa, Manang, Annapurna Circuit Trail, ShwethaKrish, ShoePenLens
Praken Gompa, Manang, Annapurna Circuit Trail

An old lady monk aka Lama was in the small cave, she blessed us and gifted us a lucky charm for the road ahead, well precisely the Thorung – La; the Pass ahead. It was quite heart touching and she also offered us hot tea which was a breather. After capturing the vistas we headed down to Manang.

Manang Annapurna Circuit Trail, ShwethaKrish, ShoePenLens
Manang Annapurna Circuit Trail

Day 8: Manang-Bhraga-Yak Kharka (13287 feet)

Our next pit-stop was to Yak Kharka, a village high up in the mountains. We started from Manang up the dusty trails and then it led us to beautiful rocky mountains with a colorful red flora. 😍

 

After about 3-4 hours, we did reach Yak Kharka. The temperature was pretty cold below 10 deg Celsius for sure… We binged on garlic soup and the ever famous Dal bhat

A pretty short day but we gained in on the altitude.

 

Day 9: Yak Kharka-Ledar-Thorung Pedi (15000 feet)

Well Thorung Pedi, our base camp for the Thorung La pass was our target for the day.

We were pretty excited that we would shortly be attempting the pass the very next day.
The hike was good but tiring as the altitude was gaining in on closer to 14400 feet.

 

Well there were some steep climbs on the way. There was a landslide area too and we carefully tread upon and made sure that we move not a pebble.

 

The stay at the base camp was fabulous; great music, spectacular ambience, food, desserts. We took into a lot of eating and celebrated as we had made it to the base camp. After some rest we looked into the road ahead and it was going to be a pretty steep climb the next day .Well we went to bed early as the next day would be a long and an epic one for sure.

 Day 10 The D-day! Thorung Pedi-High Camp-Thorung La(17769 feet) – Muktinath(12467 feet)

Well, the D-day. We woke up at 2:30 am for a quick start to a long hiking day. We started up the next stop High Camp.
It was a hard steep climb and the temperature was below zero deg😒 All I could see was the beautiful star-studded sky way above me and the trail lit by my head torch. The mountains looked like shadows towering on either side of us.

We braved ahead and made it to the High camp and took a break, grabbed a few dry fruits and we were on the trail again.

We slowly climbed the next steep trail and as I looked about, the snow clad mountains showed themselves in the twilight and they looked like steady stalwarts with a white cap 😍

 

Our next leg of the hike was very very arduous, we found it very difficult to keep ourselves at a momentum because of the altitude, we were roughly gaining 4000 odd feet in a span of 3 hours.

But something in us made us go on and on.

 

Though our energy sapped, we held on and took one step at a time. Finally, I could see the prayer flags in the distance and my heart jumped with joy. My spirits rose and tread on for the last mile to the Pass.

And there I was standing amongst a group of people rejoicing the feat along with my friend. 😊

Thorung La, Annapurna Circuit Trail, ShwethaKrish, ShoePenLens
Thorung La, Annapurna Circuit Trail

I could feel a sense of pride in me for making it through and I love myself for that, for I was a bit skeptical all the way through but here I was at the Pass, standing strong and blissfully happy 🙌

We roughly trekked about 115 kms in 10 days! That’s quite a feat we achieved!

Well we made it down to Ranipauwa village, close to Muktinath later that morning and had a pretty comfortable sleep in the famous Bob Marley hotel.

 

Muktinath is a sacred place for the Hindus as well as the Buddhists. The place was utterly beautiful adorned with yellow flowering trees and the gushing of the Gandaki river in the form of 108 springs which has a significance in the Hindu philosophy.

 

The next morning, from Muktinath we headed to Jomson by Jeep which we luckily caught and also met some amazing fellow travelers. The ride was beautiful with the brown mountains gazing at you and the Kali Gandaki river flowing across in shimmering blue. Dhaulagiri and other mountain ranges can be seen from Muktinath.

Later that night, we reached Pokhara and had our usual Rotis and Palak Paneer as the rain gave us company.

We did have a small celebration and we marked it as a successful trek across the Beautiful Annapurnas.

Onward we went to Kathmandu and then to Varanasi- A fabulous experience explained in this blog. Click here – Varanasi

Highlights / Tips for the Annapurna Circuit Trail

  1. Prepare yourself physically 4-6 months in advance
  2. Pack only what is necessary and please carry a book along to read as you would have ample time to do that
  3. Though I haven’t done the Annapurna Base camp trek, I have heard from fellow trekkers from around the world say that the Annapurna Circuit is beautiful and much worthier a trek than the Annapurna Base camp trek
  4. Please get the trekker permit and register yourself with the itinerary at the ACAP office in Pokhara
  5. Don’t bother about accommodation if you are traveling in October season as once you reach the village, ample number of homestays are available, you only need to pay for the food you eat, accommodation is free!
  6. Best part of this trek is that it is a Tea-house trail as the trail is marked with tea houses or home-stays all along the trail.
  7. Vivid changing sceneries guarantee you a solid memorable adventurous trek
  8. The journey within is all that matters on this beautiful a trail.

 

There was a time which was overwhelming

There was a time which was blissful

There was a time when everything was silent

That was the time when time stood still!

 

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Varanasi: The Flashback

Varanasi, the place was on my travel list since 5 years and I was wondering when the D-day would arrive!

Lately, I have come to realize that things happen at the right opportune time!

So it did! November 2017 was the month I set foot in Varanasi with no expectations but a heart filled with enthusiasm to explore this intriguing place. And of course with the people I adore! 😉

The ride from Sunauli (Why sunauli- read the post on Annapurna Circuit out here- Annapurna Circuit Trek) to Varanasi was quite interesting. My friend and me started early morning in the UPSRTC bus to reach Varanasi! From scenic paddy fields, mustard fields and farms galore the road took to small towns, cities and finally reached Varanasi. One can feel the chaos as soon as you hit the city center. We hired a auto-rickshaw to take us to our stay at Zostel.

It was 3pm when we reached and took some time to freshen up. We went on a stroll to explore the streets of Varanasi in the evening!

Our first pit-stop in Varanasi was at the local famous Chaat shop. We tried a variety of Chaats and of course ended with a sweet-meat! We were too tired to get on with our exploration that we took to the terrace at our stay indulging in a chat and then hit the sack after the long day!

Let me give you a glimpse of Varanasi!

So our stay was pretty close to Kashi Vishwanath temple, the main street and about 2-3 kms to the Ghats and of course the Ganges!

The streets were amazingly crowded! More than vehicles on the road, there were people and it was more difficult for the vehicles to meander through the crowd. But the two wheelers, auto-rickshaws, tuk-tuk, cycle-rickshaws and a zillion other variety of vehicles added of course to the rhythmic chaos! The street also had a good number of street vendors selling trinkets, fruits, neem twigs,chaats and what-nots! The main street leads one to the Ghats where certain rituals and ablutions take place. There along the Ghats runs Ganga with all exuberance and serenity! Along the main street the road leads to a lot of narrow alleys which house series of temples; big and small! Apart from that there are popular lassi spots, kullad chai addas, paan shops and of course the hot jalebis / samosas spots!

All in all an interesting place to explore.

Let me talk about the history and importance of Varanasi; It is a spiritual and a religious place for Hindus where one is believed to attain Liberation if one is cremated there after death!

Kashi, Benaras, Varanasi are some of the names it goes by! It is a revered city on the banks of Ganga in the state of Uttar Pradesh, India. It is called Varanasi owing to the confluence of Varuna and Assi rivers! It is known as the ‘City of Lights’-Kashi(to shine)!

We were joined by two other friends the next morning and we got on a temple hopping spree!

Each and every temple had a certain vibration and of course different deities. Right from Kalabhairav temple to Sankat mochan Mahabali Hanuman temple to Devi temple to the main Kashi Vishwanath temple to Annapurna temple, each had its beauty and fervour! (PS: these are the few temple names I remember, we did a visit a few more maybe!)

Kashi Vishwanath temple, the main temple is dedicated to Lord Shiva. It is a huge temple which houses smaller shrines and temples. The temple has withstood a lot of battles and rampage over 12th-18th Centuries owing to the Mughal attacks. The temple is beefed up with a lot of security personnel! The various smaller temples runs along the narrow alleys which is quite a meandering tour!

We were present for a couple of Aartis (rituals) at the Vishwanath temple and the energy of the chants, the mystical place, the awe-inspiring rishis were mind-blowing! I cannot put it into words but it was truly a remarkable experience!

Food and drinks are at its best out here in Varanasi. The evenings were spent in exploring and tasting the cuisine of Varanasi. Puri Bhaji, hot jalebis, Kachoris are the popular and tasty breakfast dishes. One can snack upon chaats, taste variety of lassis, kullad chai, hot-lemon teas and bhaang which is legal in the streets of Varanasi! Well, not to forget the Benarasi Paan!

One of the highlights of the place is obviously the Ganges.

She flows with all zest unperturbed about the life and death at her banks!

Sparkling her way through the lights of Sun and Moon!

Ready to sway by the flickering souls in the midst!

All set to trigger the divine you!

A boat ride takes one along the Ghats from one end to the other. It is a beautiful ride!

By the Ghats, Varanasi,ShwethaKrish, ShoePenLens
By the Ghats, Varanasi

The ghats / embankments along the Ganga are a place of rituals! Manikarnika and Harishchandra Ghat are popular for cremation rituals.

Dasashwamedh Ghat is very popular for the Ganga Aarti which takes place in the evening twilight! There are 7 Rishis who perform the rituals facing Ganga! We sat on one of the boats and saw this beautiful array of lights, lamps and of course the 7 rishis perform synchronous rituals with the lamps. It was a sight to behold! The fervour of the place, the people in unison, serene Ganga, the rishis were magnetic and splendid! This is something that one shouldn’t miss if visiting Varanasi!

The Ghats are open 24*7 and the best time to visit is in the early mornings for the spectacular Sunrise and the evenings during the Sunsets and of course the Aarti!

Sunrise at Ganges, Varanasi, ShwethaKrish, ShoePenLens
Sunrise at Ganges, Varanasi
Sunset at the Ganges, Varanasi, ShwethaKrish, ShoePenLens
Sunset at the Ganges, Varanasi

One place which we considered our amazing serene hang-out was the Nepali temple in the Lalita Ghat. The temple is a replica of Pashupatinath temple, Nepal. It is made of wood, stone and terracota. It was built by the King of Nepal during his exile and was completed by his son. It took three decades to complete this beautiful structure and it is surrounded by tamarind and peepal trees which makes it all the more lovely!

Nepali temple, Lalita Ghat, Varanasi, Shwetha Krish, ShoePenLens
Nepali temple, Lalita Ghat, Varanasi

One can also visit Banaras Hindu University (BHU) which is the largest residential University in Asia!

All in all, Varanasi is a place of wonder. One has to visit it to experience the immense beauty and delve into this mystical abode!

Unison #AtoZChallenge

U #AtoZChallenge

I have lately come to believe the power of unison!

I say it because there is a certain energy that gets created when people work towards the greater good in unison.

This energy could transform lives, world as a whole.

I am not sure whether this ideology seems practical. But lately reading a few facts about the Pyramids, watching the intriguing concept of the Avatar movie, reading about the consecration of the Dhyanalinga at the Isha Yoga Center, Coimbatore makes this notion seems feasible in a way.

On a spiritual note, we have to realize our purpose or know ourselves inside out. With that our journey is the same and we can surely work in unison to get to the other dimension.

What do you have to say about this?

The Mystic Diary by Sahan Sarvee

What are Tarot Cards? Tarot cards are a visual tool of divination that tell you about your conscious and unconscious motivations, influences and feelings through the imagery. Different symbols ARE different information here. The Tarot cards are based upon ancient occult knowledge of universal principles affecting symbols and energy. Is it Magic? No, although I […]

via What, how and why of the Tarot Cards? — themysticdiary